Icons of Foam - Boardroom Show
Al Merrick to be honored in the Icons of Foam Tribute to the Masters presented by US Blanks The Boardroom International Surfboard Show will take place May 6&7 at the Kaiser Permanente Arena. The surf lifestyle celebration showcases the surfboard manufacturing industry and features exhibits, demos, seminars, a vintage surfboard swap, music and hundreds of state-of-the-art surfboards and hard-goods from the surfboard industry’s finest craftsman, designers and manufacturers.
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Icons of Foam


Surfboard Show Announces Wayne Lynch as Icons of Foam Honoree

 

November 16, 2019 (Encinitas, Ca.) — The Boardroom International Surfboard Show today announced Wayne Lynch, dynamic Australian surfer/shaper, will be honored during the Icons of Foam Tribute to the Masters Shape-off presented by US Blanks at the 2019 Boardroom International Surfboard Show in Del Mar.

 

“It is an honor for me to be recognized for my shaping accomplishments along side the past Icons of Foam honorees,” said Lynch. “Thanks to all of them and all the craftsmen in our tiny yet global surfboard industry. See you all in May at The Boardroom.”

 

Wayne Lynch has been shaping surfboards since the age of 14. At first Lynch drew inspiration from the heavy vee bottoms of Bob McTavish and his Plastic Machines. Lynch’s shaping evolved through the decades and today are highly regarded for their clean aesthetic and tried and true reliability. A main figure in the shortboard revolution, Lynch is often referred to as the first vertical surfer, taking his loose and nimble backside approach straight up the wave face.

 

“We are over the moon to be honoring Wayne Lynch,” said Scott Bass Boardroom Show Executive Director. “The Boardroom prides itself on acknowledging great craftsmen, great shapers, and great surfers, but also great human beings. Wayne Lynch checks all the boxes. It is going to be a great show and Wayne has promised some surprises are in-store for the shape-off.”

 

Past Icons of Foam honorees include Mike Diffenderfer, Bill Caster, John Bradbury, Dick Brewer, Renny Yater, Doug Haut, Simon Anderson, Carl Ekstrom, Mark Richards, Rich Price, Terry Martin, Ben Aipa, Rusty Preisendorfer, John Mel, Gerry Lopez, Al Merrick and Marc Andreini.

 

The Boardroom, beginning it’s 12th year, is a consumer facing showcase for the surf manufacturing industry featuring shapers, designers, manufacturers, artists and of course the industry’s state-of-the-art surfboards. The show also highlights fins, wetsuits, skateboards, performance wear for both men and women, board shorts, technology, other hard-goods, the California Gold Surf Auction and much more.

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Encyclopedia of Surfing Entry: Wayne Lynch

 

Dynamic Australian goofyfoot surfer from Lorne, Victoria; teenage messiah of the shortboard revolution in the late 1960s and early ’70s, and generally regarded as the inventor of “vertical” surfing. “He was the Future of Surfing incarnate,” Hawaiian pro surfer Reno Abellira said of Lynch. “A boy wonder with searing eyes, a disarming choirboy smile, and an attacking style that often left him upside-down in the curl, only to recover in midair and land back on his wax.”

 

Lynch was born (1952) in the southwest Victoria town of Colac, the son of a fisherman-carpenter, and raised in the nearby town of Lorne, 25 miles west of Bells Beach. He began surfing at age 10; the following year he entered and won a statewide open-age contest, but event organizers, flustered by the smooth-cheeked phenomenon, hastily gave him the “Best Wave of the Day” award rather than the first-place trophy, and banned him from competing the following year, saying he was too young. In 1965 he won the first of six consecutive juniors division Victoria state titles.

 

While surf magazines published some impressive black-and-white photographs of Lynch in 1968, his star-making moment came in 1969 with the release of Evolution, Paul Witzig’s rough-hewn cult classic surf movie. Two years earlier, surfers on 10-foot-long boards were focused mainly on walking the board and hanging ten. Lynch, the 16-year-old master of the just-introduced shortboard, featured in the opening sequence of Evolution riding a 7′ 1″ stubby, changed the direction of performance surfing almost singlehandedly, riding out of a low crouch, his thin legs collapsing and extending pneumatically from one tightly arced turn to the next. Although 1966 world champion Nat Young and 1968 Bells winner Ted Spencer costarred in Evolution, the film is mostly remembered as a Lynch showcase.

 

Lynch won the juniors division of the Australian National Titles four straight times (1967 to 1970), appeared in a small number of surf films (most notably 1971’s Sea of Joy), then suddenly dropped from public view, saying he “wasn’t interested in fame or money,” and that he wanted to be “just a surfer, not a star.” Only later did he admit that he spent nearly three years avoiding Australia’s then-mandatory military service.

 

A motorcycle accident in Bali in 1972 put Lynch in an Indonesian hospital with a broken collarbone and sprained back; while there he caught malaria, was bedridden for six months, and unable to surf for all of 1973.

He returned to the water in 1974, and the following year reentered the competition scene, placing sixth at Bells, then earning $3,500 for winning the Surfabout event in Sydney, the second-richest pro event of the year. Lynch competed part-time for the next three years (finishing 11th on the debut International Professional Surfers circuit in 1976, second at the 1978 Katin Pro-Am, and second in the 1978 Surfabout), then once again retired.

In the 1978 short film A Day in the Life of Wayne Lynch, surf filmmaker Jack McCoy shows the one-time child star dividing his time between his quiet, woodsy house in Victoria and surfing alone—and brilliantly—in the deepwater reefs nearby. Lynch was regarded by many as the ultimate soul surfer. In talent and temperament three-time world champion Tom Curren of California would in years to come be likened to Lynch.

 

Lynch turned up regularly in surf videos and documentaries, including Legends: An Australian Surfing Perspective (1994), Litmus (1997), Great Waves (1998), and Biographies (2001).

 

Lynch was inducted into the Australian Surfing Hall of Fame in 1988, and was cited by Surfing magazine in a 2004 articled titled The 16 Greatest Surfers of All Time. Making another return to competition, Lynch placed ninth in the 1997 Masters (for surfers 36 and over) and fifth in the 1999 Masters.

 

In Another Day in the Life of Wayne Lynch, a 2011 short film by Cyrus Sutton, Lynch revealed that he’d had a heart attack and that over the previous few years he’d lost interest in surfing. At the end of the film, he’s seen happily riding an inflatable raft alongside his son.

 

“Uncharted Waters: the Personal History of Wayne Lynch,” a feature-length documentary, was released in 2013.

SANTA CRUZ’S TRAVIS REYNOLDS WINS ANDREINI SHAPE-OFF
Record attendance at two day surfboard celebration in Del Mar.

 

May 7, 2018 – Del Mar, Ca — A packed house at The Boardroom International Surfboard Show presented by US Blanks  watched Travis Reynolds claim the 2018 Icons of Foam Tournament of Champions Shape-off. The shape-off competition featured six former champions, and two wildcards shapers, all attempting to replicate a series of surfboards designed by Icon of Foam honoree Marc Andreini.

“Wow. I’m blown away,” said Reynolds from Santa Cruz, Ca. “It means a lot to compete against these fine shapers…to have my family here… it’s incredible. What an honor to win the Marc Andreini Shape-off and to compete against this crew of past champions. I’ve been thinking about our friend Chris Lundy who passed away recently. I dedicate this victory to Chris.”

The eight international shapers: defending champ Rex Marechal, Ricky Carroll, Wayne Rich, Stu Kenson, Roger Hinds, Matt Calvani, Bill Barnfield and eventual winner Travis Reynolds.

This years format consisted of man-on-man heats with single elimination. Round one saw the competitors replicate an Andreini Michael Peterson inspired design, round two an Andreini Vaquero, and the final heat pitted #3 seed Wayne Rich vs. #8 seed Travis Reynolds as they each shaped an 11′ Andreini glider. US Blanks provided all the foam for the event and $1K was awarded to Reynolds in closely judged final, and Reynolds’ name etched into the Icons of Foam Tribute to the Masters Mike Marshall perpetual trophy.

ABOUT THE SHOW

  • 6321 people attended the show
  • Barry Snyder of Barry Snyder Designs and Jack Sabala of Night Train Surfboards took top honors in Best in Show presented by Ziobaffa Organic Wines: Snyder won for Best In Show Airbrush and Sabala for Best In Show Resin Color Work.
  • Hansens Surfboards and Dick Brewer Surfboards were honorable mentions in Best in Show.
  • 12 boards laminated on-site in the Douglas Surf Products lamination demo
  • 108 autographs by Marc Andreini
  • 131 surfboards were sold
  • 10 surfboards given away
  • 45 custom surfboard orders written
  • 74 rare and unique surfboards sold at California Gold Surf Auction.

 

VIPs in attendance included Renny Yater, Jeff Timpone, Jojo Roper, Joe Roper, Dick Brewer, Chris Christenson, Malcolm Campbell, Chas Smith, Dave Parmenter, Carl Ekstrom, Steve Pendarvis, Cher Pendarvis, Sam Cody, Steve Walden, Randy French, Gregory Harrison, Sam George, Britt Merrick, Jon Pyzel and many others.

Icons of Foam 2018: Craftsman Marc Andreini To Be Honored

DEL MAR, CA., SEPTEMBER 20, 2017 — — Longtime Santa Barbara and north coast shaper Marc Andreini will be honored during the Icons of Foam Tribute to the Masters Shape-off presented by US Blanks at the 2018 Boardroom International Surfboard Show in Del Mar.

Marc Andreini has been designing, shaping and building custom surfboards for over 50 years. Andreini continues to be an active and prolific shaper, evolving and experimenting with different board types; recently leading the charge with the Greenough inspired Edge design concept.

“It is an honor for me to be considered amongst the likes of Diff, Yater, Bradbury, Merrick, all of the Icons.” said Andreini. “Thanks to all of them and the other craftsmen in our industry. See you all in May at The Boardroom.”

“We are delighted to honor Marc Andreini,” said Scott Bass Boardroom Show Executive Director. “The Boardroom prides itself on acknowledging the best of the best. Andreini enjoys a fervent loyal following of surfers, and he is an underground legend. The shapers selected to compete in the shape-off will have their work cut out for them, as Marc’s designs contain subtle flowing curves and rockers.”

Past Icons of Foam honorees include Mike Diffenderfer, Bill Caster, John Bradbury, Dick Brewer, Renny Yater, Doug Haut, Simon Anderson, Carl Ekstrom, Mark Richards, Rich Price, Terry Martin, Ben Aipa, Rusty Preisendorfer, John Mel, Gerry Lopez, and Al Merrick.

The Boardroom, beginning it’s 11th year, is a consumer facing showcase for the surf manufacturing industry featuring shapers, designers, manufacturers, artists and of course the industry’s state-of-the-art surfboards. The show also highlights fins, wetsuits, skateboards, performance wear for both men and women, board shorts, technology, other hard-goods, the California Gold Surf Auction and much more.

photo Paul Ferraris

Icons of Foam Tribute to the Masters Honoring
Marc Andreini
presented by US Blanks

  • Two shaping bays used
  • Each shaper receives same amount of strict time in the shaping bay.
  • Shapers bring in their own tools.
  • A USBlank and template are provided.
  • The board to be replicated will be revealed on the day of the event.
  • Each shaper will receive 5 minutes prior to their time to take measurements within the shaping bay.
  • The board will then remain outside of the shaping bay.
  • Shapers can step out and touch, fondle & look at the board at anytime. They may not re-measure it.
  • Marc Andreini judges the anonymous finished blanks.
  • The winners check of $1K will be presented on Sunday at 3:30PM.

Marc Andreini Shaping Highlights
1957 The Andreini family moves to Santa Barbara. Marc and his brother Pete began their life long surf journey at Ledbetter and Miramar, occasionally sneaking up to Hammonds when the older guys weren’t around.

1963 Andreini (and brother Pete) discover the White Owl Surf Shop in Summerland. Much to the chagrin of owner Jeff White the surf shop became their home away from home.  Not able to run them off, White puts them on what became the Surf N Wear Surf Team.  Andreini rides only White Owls up until the time they stop making them. Then Andreini starts making them himself!

1964 The first complete board (shaped and glassed) Andreini ever made is a belly board with materials sourced from White Owl scrap.

1968 Andreini makes his first legitimate surfboard, a Greenough templated 7’ 3” swallow tail. Andreini uses the remains of a beat up Owl salvaged from the cave at Steamer Lane. His career begins.

1970 Andreini’s quest for ultimate design expertise and craftsmanship begins and he builds two 6’ twin fins by hand –including the fins, using no power tools. Living in Half Moon Bay, Andreini builds board with Robert Johnson and one of his early customers was a grommet named Jeff Clark. Later that year he moves back to Santa Barbara.

1971 Andreini finds a paying job at Spindrift Surfboards and ends up buying them out, equipment and all for $125. He changes the name to Andreini Surfboards and continues as a full time surfboard shaper until 1979. Andreini builds boards for a loyal crew of surfers and picks up extra work glassing and sanding boards on the side for Al Merrick, Rennie Yater, John Bradbury and Bob Duncan.

1973 Andreini moves to the North Shore of Oahu with Bill Barnfield where they build boards and surf them at Pipeline. He picks up work glassing for Mike Eaton under the Bing label.

1975-1978 The Golden Years. Andreini shares a building alongside his idol Renny Yater on Gray Ave in Santa Barbara.

1979 Andreini goes into the insurance business but continues to build boards for himself and small loyal flock, including good buddy Kirk Putnam.

1987 Andreini and Putnam chat on the phone about a board they both admire in the classic surf flick “Innermost Limits of Pure Fun” — a mid-length with a square tail. The two meet up at Yater’s shaping bay in Santa Barbara and the now classic Vaquero design takes form.  With a felt tip pen in hand, KP scripts “Vaquero de Los Olas”.

2002 Andreini is tasked with building 13 Hot Curls out of old growth redwood and the boards are the subject of several articles in the surf magazines.

2007 Andreini is selected by his peers to represent the Santa Barbara region competing in the first ever Icons of Foam Tribute to the Masters Shape-off honoring Mike Diffenderfer at the Sacred Craft (now The Boardroom).

2008 Andreini is selected to compete in the Icons of Foam Tribute to the Masters Shape-off honoring underground Santa Barbara shaper John Bradbury. Andreini wins the shape-off recreating a classic Bradbury 5′ 11″ stringerless EPS 4-channel tri-fin.

MARC ANDREINI’S SURFING INFLUENCES
“It has to be Phil Edwards. Most people of my generation think that Phil Edwards is number one. Duke Kahanamoku will remain the godfather of all modern surfing. Phil Edwards is the performance version of The Duke. Grace, beauty, agility, finesse, and stateliness. Phil was a master of trim and positioning and surfing with speed. He was purely a trim-based surfer. In their respective books, Nat Young and Bob McTavish both cite that their primary influence in surfing was Phil Edwards. Skip Frye says that he and Mike Hynson, both two of the finest surfers, wore on their trunks a little inscription reading P.O.P.E. It stood for Protegés of Phil Edwards. Phil was the Holy Grail – he was the master. If you are a student of trim and power and flow – it all goes back to Phil Edwards.”

The winning shaper receives $1K.

And their name etched on to the MIKE MARSHALL PERPETUAL TROPHY alongside past winners Ricky Carroll, Pat Rawson, Marc Andreini, Wayne Rich, Matt Biolos, Ward Coffey, Stu Kenson, Matt Calvani, Roger Hinds, Ryan Lovelace, Nick Palandrani & Rex Marechal.

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